ucuz ukash

2014-15 Performances and Public Events

MrsPirandelloIn Search of Mrs. Pirandello, a Reading

August 13, 2015

Time: 7:30pm
Venue: Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor
Admission: PWYC reserve at rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com

Written by playwright and Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies alumni Michaela Di Cesare, In Search of Pirandello investigates the story of Maria Antonietta Portulano wife of Italian playwright Luigi Pirandello. In December 2013, Michaela Di Cesare began a year as Playwright-in-Residence at Imago Theatre, under the mentorship of Micheline Chevrier. Over the course of that year, Michaela peeled away the layers that kept this mysterious woman under wraps, confronting time and again the fact that Pirandello is beloved and regarded as having brought Italian theatre out of the dark ages. Panel discussion to follow reading.

This reading is sponsored by the Playwrights Guild of Canada.

Poster V3 PRINT READY1Festival of Early Drama- Celebrating 50 years of PLS (Poculi Ludique Societas)

June 5-7, 2015

Poculi Ludique Societas (PLS) continues its year-long celebration of 50 years of performance research practice at the University of Toronto with the FESTIVAL OF EARLY DRAMA #FoED2015 #pls50th.  The festival kicks off at 6 pm on Friday June 5 with a performance of Ben Jonson’s Masque of Queens presented by Loyola University, New Orleans. This opening gala performance will be followed by a celebratory reception at 8 pm at Alumni Hall, Victoria University.

FoED2015 includes productions presented by fifteen medieval and renaissance theatre troupes from across North America. Joining us are university theatre companies from New Orleans to Indiana, as well as the University of Western Ontario, Brock, and McMaster Universities and others across Ontario.

With multiple PWYC family-friendly events happening over two days on the U of T campus, FoED2015 is sure to appeal to families, scholars, students, and medieval and early modern history enthusiasts.

Festival Box Office: 150 Charles St (At Museum Station)

Free outdoor family-friendly events daily starting at 11 am

Ticket prices: $15 Adult/$12 Student

50th Anniversary Reception June 5 at  8pm:  $17

Ben Jonson Masque of Queens + Reception June 5: $27.50

Tickets available online at UofTTix.ca

www.plsfest.ca

“In Sundry Languages” presented by the Centre for Drama, Theatre, Performance Studies and the Toronto Laboratory Theatre

May 15 and 16, 2015

Time: 7:00pm
Venue: Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor
Free Admission. To reserve a seat email rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com or call 416-978-7987

An outrageously multilingual theatre experiment is looking for an outrageously multilingual theatre audience. Languages used and abused: various dialects of Mandarin, Farsi, Russian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, Esperanto among many others. Translation used: none.

Director-Researcher: Արտ Բաբայանց /Art Babayants

Thesis Supervisor: Prof. Kathleen Gallagher

Additional Dramaturgical Support: Gabrielle Houle, Shelley Liebembuk.

This project represents artistic research and is part of a dissertation study. Audience members will be asked to complete a consent form before the show and a survey after the show.
For more information about the Toronto Laboratory Theatre visit their website: http://www.torontolab.org/

JHIMUsicIt’s Really — Like Music

March 27th, 2015

Pre-show Chat: 7:15pm / Performance: 8:00pm
Venue: Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor
Free Admission

“It’s Really–Like Music,” explores the intersection between music, theatre, mathematics, and games.
Legendary Toronto composer Udo Kasemets described composing, in 1972, as a process of “learning to know what life and nature […] are about, and to present a report on these studies by using all means available, including sounds.” And speaking later about his lifelong interest in mathematics said, “Math is a misunderstood phenomenon. […] It’s really—like music—a way of notating and trying to explain how nature works.” Kasemets’s Tt: Tribute to Buckminster Fuller, Marshall McLuhan, John Cage features “aural and visual presentations and illuminations (by means of speech, recordings, slide projections, films, sculptural constructions, etc.) of words ideas and images of B. Fuller, M. McLuhan and J. Cage,” which are then manipulated according to the wishes of the audience, taken via a live poll and processed with a computer according to Kasemets’ instructions. First realized in Toronto in 1968, Tt is a landmark work in the interaction of music and technology.
Games and shifting mathematical systems also shape the remainder of the program: Canadian composer Ann Southam’s Natural Resources (or What to do until the power comes on) featuring two percussionists performing on a constantly changing array of instruments; Algorythmically-generated compositions by Karlheinz Essl, Gustav Ciamaga, and Dennis Patrick, and; Mozart’s Musikalisches Würfelspiel (1787), a musical dice game that randomly ‘generates’ a complete composition from Mozart’s pre-composed fragments. Featuring performers: Rick Sacks, David Schotzko, Jane Smythe, Steven Conway, Adam Tindale, and Richard Windeyer.

Final_Kleist_Poster_print (2)Katie of Heilbronn: An Obsession By Mr. Heinrich Von Kleist

March 3rd – 14th, 2015

Showtimes: Tuesday to Saturday at 8:00pm
Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, 79 St. George Street
Tickets: $10 Student / $15 Regular Admission Email rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com

Why do we fall in love? Why do we decide we love someone else? What is it exactly that drives us to say: “You’re the one—no, wait, you’re the one…”

Part fairy tale, part romantic fantasy, and part waking dream, Katie of Heilbronn: An Obsession presented by The Centre for Drama Theatre and Performance Studies and directed by Baņuta Rubess is a play about desire and love and at what point love itself can become an obsession. The play follows Katie, a sixteen-year-old girl, as she stalks Count vom Strahl. Driven by an all-consuming desire that has engulfed Katie since her first chance meeting with the handsome knight, Katie trails Strahl while he, in turn, searches for his own “true” love. Written by the German Romantic playwright Heinrich von Kleist in 1808, Kleist’s
experimental and innovative style made him a literary and artistic outcast. Yet the universal themes within his works—like passion and compulsion—have led to his acclaim among contemporary artists and authors. With original vignettes (researched, written, and performed by the cast) that explore present-day
obsessions, director Baņuta Rubess gives a contemporary spin to this chivalric tale in an original re-visioning of Kleist’s play.

PA-poster-smallPlaying Age Symposium

February 27th-28th, 2015

Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, Walden and Front and Long Rooms

The Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies is proud to announce Playing Age, an inter-disciplinary symposium that will be held at the University of Toronto from February 27-28, 2015 at the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse. Renowned scholars Elinor Fuchs (Yale University, School of Drama) and Margaret Morganroth Gullette (Brandeis University, Women’s Studies Research Center) will present keynote addresses.

The symposium Playing Age offers a humanistic exploration of aging, old age, and inter-generational relations. Seminal theorists of play, from Johan Huizinga to Roger Caillois, claimed that rule-bounded games and mimetic enactments create a magic circle in which conflicts within the self and the community can be negotiated at a safe remove.

More recently, performance and game theorists have insisted that even playing within the bounded precincts of a stadium, a theatre, or a video game influences everyday conduct, particularly when we play with volatile topics like inter-cultural representations, social class, race and gender. This symposium asks how aging and old age can be investigated through playing, specifically the playfulness of artistic representations, and whether aging is uniquely available for or resistant to, imaginative inhabitations.

A conference programme is available at http://playingage.wordpress.com

OtherMozart_Poster_4.0THE OTHER MOZART

February 13th-15th, 2015

Showtimes: Friday-Saturday at 8pm / Sunday at 2:00pm
Venue: Luella Massey Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris Street
Free Admission: To reserve a spot email rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com

The true little known story of Mozart’s prodigy sister comes to life in THE OTHER MOZART, a dramatic new solo show written by Sylvia Milo and directed by Isaac Byrne. Nannerl Mozart was a child musical prodigy, a keyboard virtuoso and composer, who performed throughout Europe with her brother to equal acclaim, but her work and her story faded away, lost to history. Set in and on a sweeping 18 foot dress (designed by Magdalena Dabrowska from the National Theatre of Poland), and amidst the Enlightenment and a climate of great social change that still resonates today, the play is based on facts, stories and lines pulled directly from the Mozart family’s humorous and heartbreaking letters. Along with music composed by her famous brother and Marianna Martines (a female composer who inspired Nannerl), original music was written for the play by Nathan Davis and Phyllis Chen (of Lincoln Centre’s Mostly Mozart Festival and the International Contemporary Ensemble) using clavichords, music boxes, bells, teacups, and fans.

The Other Mozart was developed at the Piccolo Spelto Festival and at the Cherry Lane Theatre in NYC as part of their All for One Festival. It was presented at the Berkshire Fringe in 2013 in Austria, where it repeatedly returned in 2014 at the invitation of the Mozarteum Foundation and Mozarteum University in Salzburg. This past summer the play had its off-Broadway run at the HERE Arts Centre in New York City, to critical acclaim.

Costumes: Magdalena Dabrowska (dress) and Miodrag Gubernic (pannier/corset sculptor)
Lighting Design: Joshua Rose
Hair Design: Courtney Bednarowski
Choreographer: Janice Orlandi
Design Concept: Anna Sroka

Colloquium featuring Julia Cooper and Kim Solga

January 13th, 2015

Time: 2:00pm -4:00pm
Venue: CDTPS Seminar Room, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor

Abstract – Julia Cooper
Move on, buck up, there are plenty of fish in the sea. Grieving a death and a broken heart, or a lost love object is not often met with patience
in our contemporary moment, and melancholia—the refusal to complete the work of mourning—is pathologized as a narcissistic illness. Julia Cooper’s
work considers how by resisting the violent injunction to “move on” from her sorrow, the melancholic creates instead affective utopias through which
to experience her pain and the new forms of thinking it generates. The words “melancholy”and “utopia” may seem an odd pairing, as the former is
often associated with despair and isolation, while the latter is associated with hope and collectivity. However, the concepts of melancholy and utopia
share a resistance to forfeiting an ideal, a refusal to accept that what is literally absent must also be affectively gone from our lives. In this talk, Cooper will look at the space of the kitchen in Harmony Korine’s “Gummo” (1997) as one such melancholy utopia— a place where resistance is
performed, and belonging and grief re-imagined.

Julia Cooper is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto where she studies grief, vulnerability, and ethics in contemporary American literature and film. She is also the managing editor of the feminist film journal “cléo.”

Abstract – Kim Solga
1988 And All That: Rethinking the Feminist Approach to Realism

It’s been nearly three decades since Jill Dolan, Elin Diamond, Janelle Reinelt and Lynda Hart, among others, pioneered the brand of theatre
scholarship that has come to be known as Feminist Performance Theory. This work involved, among other things, dismantling existing assumptions about the political stakes of looking at sexed and gendered bodies in the theatre by challenging the widely-held belief that genre provides an ideologically neutral framework for bodies to appear on stage. In particular, feminist theorists gunned for stage realism; its formations, they argued, simply reinforced familiar narratives in which female characters are pathological trouble-makers, problems to be solved, within a closed universe whose
unities of time, place and action created a seductive sheen of inevitability. As one character in Split Britches’ “Streetcar” satire “Belle Reprieve” remarks, channelling Dolan: we all agreed that realism is bad for us.

The feminist critique of stage realism has been profoundly influential, and it remains a kind of dogma even today. But what if we’ve overstated the
case? The primarily American theorists who opposed stage realism with vehemence were by and large referencing extremely particular versions of
the form; meanwhile, other feminist scholars treated other forms (including British social realism, and Ibsenite naturalism) with a nuance we often
forget about as we slag off the genre. What has the feminist critique of stage realism forgotten to account for? What productive details within that
critique has history chosen to forget or ignore? And: what kinds of political work might contemporary iterations of stage realism be able
to do “for feminism” now? This paper will explore these questions first by revisiting some key work on the topic by major feminist scholars, and second by looking at Katie Mitchell’s recent hyper-realist production of “A Woman Killed With Kindness” at the National Theatre, London, as exemplary of thebest feminist realist performance today.

Kim Solga is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Writing Studies at Western University, where she is a founding instructor in the
Theatre Studies major program. From 2012-2014 she was Senior Lecturer in the Department of Drama, Queen Mary University of London. Her most recent book is “Theatre & Feminism”, forthcoming in 2015 from Palgrave. With D.J. Hopkins she has edited “Performance and the City” and “Performance and the Global City”, the latter of which will appear in paperback this summer. With Roberta Barker she has edited both volumes of “New Canadian Realisms”, available from Playwrights Canada Press. With Susan Bennett, she is a general editor of the new Methuen/Bloomsbury series, “Theory for Theatre Studies”, the first three volumes of which will appear in 2016. She is a proud graduate of the Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies (when it was just the Drama Centre!).

Playing Age: A Symposium

February 27-28, 2015

Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, 79 St. George Street
Admission: All events are free and open to the public

The Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies is proud to announce Playing Age, an inter-disciplinary symposium that features keynote addresses by renowned scholars Elinor Fuchs (Yale University, School of Drama) and Margaret Morganroth Gullette (Brandeis University, Women’s Studies Research Center).

A conference programme is available at http://playingage.wordpress.com

The symposium Playing Age offers a humanistic exploration of ageing, old age, and inter-generational relations. Seminal theorists of play, from Johan Huizinga to Roger Caillois, claimed that rule-bounded games and mimetic enactments create a magic circle in which conflicts within the self and the community can be negotiated at a safe remove.

More recently, performance and game theorists have insisted that even playing within the bounded precincts of a stadium, a theatre, or a video game influences everyday conduct, particularly when we play with volatile topics like inter-cultural representations, social class, race and gender. This symposium asks how aging and old age can be investigated through playing, specifically the playfulness of artistic representations, and whether aging is uniquely available for or resistant to, imaginative inhabitations.

Director’s Shows

paper_series_poster1paperSERIES by David Yee

Directed by Deborah Lim
December 5th – 6th at 7:00pm and December 7th at 2:00pm
Free Admission. To reserve rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com

paperSERIES by David Yee is a collection of six vignettes linked together by paper and explores ideas of loss, identity, relationships, and racial stereotypes. While the various stories embrace an array of genres, writing styles, and types of characters, together they paint a picture of the here and the now. Set in present day Toronto, it is about the taxi cab driver, the restaurant worker, the heart-broken lover, and the everyday person who wants to be misunderstood, accepted and to simply get through the day.

Theatre of the Film Noir by George F. WalkerFilm_Noir_Poster (3)

Directed by Esmé Coyle
December 5th – 6th at 9:00pm and December 7th at 4:00pm
Free Admission. To reserve rsvp.dramacentre@gmail.com

The truth is never black and white…

Paris, 1944: German occupation has finally been lifted. While the war continues to rage elsewhere, a smokescreen of normalcy has descended upon the city. But the discovery of a murdered man sparks a new series of deceptions and desperate plays for survival as his friends, enemies, and lovers tangle in the Parisian rubble. Through the stylistic lens of the Film Noir and Walker’s darkly comic point of view, we are faced with the end of civilization, and the questions that come after: Is there any need for truth? Can there be guilt when there is no innocence? The only certainty in a world of crumbling facades, death, and upheaval, is that the truth is never black and white.

ColloquiumDec2Colloquium

Natalia Esling – “The (En)activated Spectator: How Sensory Modification Affects/Effects Reception
Pil Hansen – “Research Based Practice: Transcending Methodological Barriers Between the Cognitive Sciences and the Performing Arts”

Date: Tuesday December 2nd/ 10:00am – 12:00pm
Venue: Seminar Room, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor

“The (En)activated Spectator: How Sensory Modification Affects/Effects Reception”
This paper will draw on theories of embodied and enactive cognition to evaluate the effects on audience reception of blindfolding the spectator during an immersive/participatory performance. My approach to analysing the effects of this ‘sense-specific’ disruption is to consider audience reception from the standpoints of both phenomenology and cognitive science. I argue that, in the absence of visual signs, the generation of meaning becomes a redistribution of attention among the senses, relying less on symbolic cues and more on psychophysical and physiological encounters and responses. After briefly introducing my case study (Projet in situ’s piece Tu vois ce que je veux dire?), I will evaluate the relationship between the blindfolded spectator/participant and her dancer/guide in terms of conventional theories of audience reception. I then attend to the spectator’s experience, proposing that the parameters of engagement for the piece are adaptable, which allows the spectator to experience a renewed, or heightened sense of embodiment. Here, meaning is generated through the body and through action, and is not contingent upon informational interactions (Di Paulo 2012). I attempt to explore how an enactive mode of spectatorship affects the quality of appreciation for this particular performance. Enactivism understands that our actions and experiences are informed by “situated embodied interactions and engagements with worldly offerings” (Hutto and Myin 2013). And yet, while basic mentality—understood as mental activity demonstrating both phenomenality and intentional directedness—presumes to entail “the manipulation of content,” Hutto and Myin posit that embodied interactions are not inherently “contentful.” Building on the concept of enactive representation, this presentation will address the following questions: what are the physiological and perceptual effects of withdrawing the sense of sight, specifically in the context of a performance that identifies itself as choreographic and involves self-motion? And how does this sensory modification enhance or limit the process of “sense-making” for the spectator/participant (Machon 2011)?

“Research Based Practice: Transcending Methodological Barriers Between the Cognitive Sciences and the Performing Arts”
Pil Hansen will focus on the methodological challenges and solutions that emerge when pursuing empirical research between dance practice, dance scholarship, and cognitive science. In 2009 Hansen co-designed a Research-Based Practice model with Dr. Bruce Barton, which sets up a feed-back system between the members of an interdisciplinary research group and allows them to advance through exchange without surrendering disciplinary specificity. In this presentation, Hansen will outline and further develop this model through the example of her recent SSHRC-funded study into the adaptation of autobiographical memory in the task-based dance creation, /Acts of Memory /(2009-12). Of particular interest is the discussion of the kinds of knowledge/performance that the model can produce, limitations of utility, and approaches that can improve our ability to transcend disciplinary barriers.

ColloquiumNov18Colloquium

Christine Mazumdar – “Ni Oui Ni Non: A Choreographic Reshaping of Aesthetic Sport”
Xing Fan – “The Nature and Expression of Beauty in Beijing Opera Model Plays during China’s Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)”

Date: Tuesday November 18th / 10:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: Seminar Room, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor

“Ni Oui Ni Non: A Choreographic Reshaping of Aesthetic Sport” 

Engaging the intersectionality of athleticism and artistry in aesthetic sport, “Ni Oui Ni Non: A Choreographic Reshaping of Aesthetic Sport” considers  Azerbaijani gymnast Marina Durunda’s performance during the 2014 “Miss Valentine” Rhythmic Gymnastics Competition in Tartu, Estonia. Durunda stepped out onto the competitive carpet to perform her clubs routine to a classical lyrical piano piece by Persian composer, Fariborz Lachini, entitled Dance of Leaves.  However, as she commenced her routine, the music that played in the arena was French jazz/folk artist Zaz’s Ni Oui Ni Non.  Without hesitation, Durunda improvised, modifying her choreography on the fly to suit the up-tempo song. Moving fluidly and spontaneously between the two choreographies—the planned versus the live-improvised—Durunda unintentionally privileged the “artistic” component of her performance over the “technical.”

“The Nature and Expression of Beauty in Beijing Opera Model Plays during China’s Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)”

This is the last chapter of Xings manuscript and she welcomes feedback.  Each of the early chapters in the manuscript focuses on one major artistic component of Beijing opera model productions: playwriting, acting, music, design, and directing.  In the last chapter, she offers further reflection on their collaborative pursuits from a comprehensive aesthetic perspective because it is the interrelations and interactions among the artistic aspects that produce and define the aesthetic experiences of these plays. 

In examining aesthetics, this chapter focuses on the nature and expression of beauty.  It begins with the notion of beautys position in the highest authoritys deliberations.  Xing then discusses two important aesthetic qualities, the beauty of the sublime and the beauty of masculinity.  The two dominant aesthetic qualities serve as the point of departure for examining Beijing opera model playsaesthetic features and their association with those of traditional Beijing opera.  In exploring the deeper reasons for the aesthetic features with imbalance as the core, in the last section, Xing relates the manifestations of the three traditional aesthetic principlesconventionalization, stylization, and synthesisin Beijing opera model plays to the overarching creative method, the Combination of Revolutionary Realism and Revolutionary Romanticism.

jhiJHI Program for the Arts: Opening Up the Space: A Festival in Music and Theatre Part I

Paradoxical by Nature

Date: Friday, November 7th at 7:30pm
Venue: Walter Hall, 80 Queens Park Crescent
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Featuring the works of:
John Cage
Mozart
Mauricio Kagel
and Erik Satie’s only play The Ruse of Medusa (1913)

Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Dramaturgical Team and Performers:
Matt Jones as the BARON
Brittany Stewart as the VOICE OF THE PIECE
Sarah Robbins and Sarah Marchand as POLYCARPE
Jessica Thorpe as JONAS the MONKEY
Steven Conway as ASTOLFO
Simone Brodies as FRIZZY
Cecilia Lee on PIANO

and Stephanie Zidel, Tina Sterling, Sebastian Samur, Christine Mazumdar, T. Nikki Cesare Schotzko as the dramaturgical team.

Poster-Digital-MarketingPLS 50th Anniversary Celebration FULGENS and LUCRES

Poculi Ludique Societas is celebrating 50 years as an internationally renowned early and medieval English drama company, with a special gala presentation of the first ever printed English play, Henry Medwall’s Fulgens and Lucres.

Fulgens, a semi-serious comedy about the nature of nobility, was intended to be staged as the entertainment to a banquet, and PLS will revive the play this fall in all its festive splendor at University College’s West Hall with a banquet feast. Regular performances of the play will also be presented at the Luella Massey Studio Theatre.

PLS history is traced to 1964 and began as part of the work for a University of Toronto graduate seminar in Medieval Drama when the seminar’s director, Prof. John Leyerle, invited the class to stage a medieval play.  Excited by the success of their production of Everyman, the members of the class came together again the following year to stage another play.  Thus was PLS born. Fifty years and more than 150 productions later, PLSis known around the world for its pioneering performances of the drama of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Fulgens and Lucres is co-produced with The Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies and is directed by Matthew Milo Sergi, assistant professor of English at U of T. Sergi trained as a theatre director at the Tisch school of arts in New York City, and he brings a rollicking playfulness to the direction of the play. Costumes are designed by Linda Phillips and the banquet menu was created by Executive Chef Michael Kobayashi and his team at University College.

Dates
November 7th, 7:30pm PWYC Preview Performance
Venue: West Hall, University College

November 8th, 7:00pm Gala Presentation, Tickets $80
Venue: West Hall University College

November 9th, 2:00pm, Tickets $20/$15/$10
Venue: West Hall University College

November 14th and 15th, 7:30pm, Tickets $20/$15/$10
Venue: Luella Massey Studio Theatre

November 16th, 2:00pm, Tickets $20/$15/$10
Venue: Luella Massey Studio Theatre

For tickets call 416-978-7986 More information about PLS can be found at plspls.ca

DC_RebelActs_Poster_Part2_FAREBEL ACTS: Guillermo Gómez-Peña and La Pocha Nostra in residency at the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

October 26th-November 1st, 2014
For the first time in over five years, Guillermo Gómez-Peña and La Pocha core troupe members will convene in Toronto for a series of performances, workshops, and dialogues. Based in San Francis-co, La Pocha Nostra provides a support network and forum for artists of various disciplines, generations, and ethnic backgrounds. La Pocha Nostra is a transdisciplinary, transnational arts collective working across national borders, race, gender, and generations as an act of radical citizen diplomacy and as a means to create temporary communities of rebel artists.

Tuesday October 28thImaginary Activism Solo Performance with Guillermo Gómez-Peña
Time: 8:00pm Venue: Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street 3rd Floor

Wednesday October 29th: Artist-Activist Dialogue
Time: 8:00pm Venue: Luella Massey Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris Street

Thursday October 30th: Workshop Performance Salon
Time: 8:00pm Venue: Luella Massey Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris Street

Friday October 31st: Canadian Premiere of Corpo Insurrecto 3.2, Ensemble Performance
Time: 8:00pm Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, 79 St. George Street

Saturday November 1st: Canadian Premiere of Corpo Insurrecto 3.2, Ensemble Performance
Time: 8:00pm Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse

All tickets for these events are free, but seating is limited. To reserve rsvp to rebecca.biason@utoronto.ca or call 416-978-7987

The Frog Prince by Clara Ryland

FrogPrincePoster

Originally written and performed in 1896

When: Saturday October 18th 7:00pm, Sunday October 19th 2:00pm
**Note: The show will run approximately 25 minutes
Venue: Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, Front Room, 79 St. George Street
Free Admission, seating is limited. To reserve tickets: 416-978-7987 or rebecca.biason@utoronto.ca

The Four Laureates Benefit: An evening of poetry and live music with four Canadian poets laureate Poet Laureates Poster5-cropmarks

When: October 8th, 2014, at 8:00pm

Venue: Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor

Tickets: $5 for Students, $15 General Admission- uofttix.ca 416-978-8849 or buy them at the door
The Four Laureates Benefit is in support of the United Way of Toronto. All proceeds from ticket sales will go to the United Way of Toronto. Featuring four Canadian poet laureates, George Elliott Clarke, Terry Burns, Dennis Lee, and Pier Giorgio Di Cicco as well as an array of live Canadian musicians, this promises to be a fun and entertaining night.

playertoplayerEmcee2Player to Player: The Emcee from Cabaret Moderated by Martin Julien 
When: October 6th, 2014 at 7:30pm
Venue: The Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College Street, 3rd Floor

Join Brent Carver, Juan Chioran, and Bruce Dow as they discuss playing the role of the Emcee in Cabaret. This promises to be a night of provocative discussion centred around the role and the era of Weimar cabaret in 1920’s Berlin. Light refreshments will be provided.

Friday Chat Series with Ame Henderson: 2:00pm-4:00pm, Luella Massey Studio TheatrePresentation1

Ame Henderson is the Artistic Director of Public Recordings, an atelier committed to experimental choreography. She grew up on Vancouver Island and is now based in Toronto. Public Recordings’ commitment to a collaborative practice is both a political and an aesthetic engagement resulting in a range of projects including publications, performances, and exhibitions. She has created works in residence at Harbourfront Centre (Toronto), Tanz Quartier Vienna, Gallery TPW (Toronto), OBORO (Montreal) and the Art Gallery of York University (Toronto) among others. Her recent works – Henderson/Castle: voyager (2014) and what we are saying (2013) – were both nominated for 2014 Dora Awards, with what we are saying winning for Best Ensemble and Best Production in the Dance divisions.


RSS
şahin k porno
Farkli porno izle me siteleri
escort fatih escort bayan bayan escort escort